Question and Answers

    Question
    Category: Cargo Work
    marinetales April 15, 2021
    At least 16% of Oxygen is required to support combustion.
    Category: Cargo Work
    marinetales April 15, 2021
    Standardised Cargo : Standardised Cargo means a Cargo for Which a ship is provided with an approved securing system based upon Cargo units of specific types. Non -standardised Cargo : means Cargo which requires individual stowage and securing arrangements.
    Category: Cargo Work
    marinetales October 29, 2020
    Yes it can be loaded below decks. For above deck it shall be done in accordance with the provisions of the Timber Code
    Category: Cargo Work
    marinetales September 9, 2020
    Uprights are used to secure the timber cargo when loaded at height so that it does not topple and go overboard..........
    Category: Cargo Work
    marinetales August 27, 2020
    The Moisture Content of the cargo determines whether the cargo would develop flow state or not. The higher the Moisture content, higher the chances that the Cargo will shift (due to development of flow state). The Moisture content at which the Cargo develops Flow State is called the Flow Moisture Point (FMP). The value of Moisture Content at which the cargo can be safely transported is called Transportable Moisture Limit or TML. The TML is usually 90% of the FMP.
    Category: Cargo Work
    marinetales August 29, 2020
    A Document of Compliance issued by the Flag State (or RO on behalf of the Flag State) is valid for a maximum of 5 years and certifies: • that the construction and equipment of the ship was found to comply with the provisions of regulation II-2/54 of SOLAS 74, as amended, and • that the ship is suitable for the carriage of those classes of dangerous goods as specified in the appended Schedules to the certificate, subject to any provisions of the IMDG Code and the Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes (BC Code) for the individual substances (more)
    Category: Cargo Work
    marinetales August 30, 2020
    The Code of Safe Practice for Ships Carrying Timber Deck Cargoes, 2011 (2011 TDC Code) is non-mandatory and applies to all ships of 24 m or more in length carrying a TIMBER DECK CARGO. The Code aims to ensure that stowage and cargo securing arrangements for timber deck cargoes enable a safe yet rational securing of the cargo so that it is satisfactorily prevented from shifting. The 2011 TDC Code also includes alternative design principles, taking into account the acceleration forces cargo may be subjected to throughout the voyage. More specifically, the 2011 TDC Code provides: Practices for safe transportation (more)
    Category: Cargo Work
    marinetales August 30, 2020
    Loading precautions for wheat - 1. Check whether regularly and be ready to close holds in case of any precipitation. 2. Check that The loading should always be carry out evenly. 3.All empty spaces shall be carefully filled by the loading hopper/spout/grab, to maximise the usage of grain capacity and reduce scope of shifting 4. No naked lights on deck/ no smoking 5. Loading grain gives rise to dust so ask the personnel to use dust masks/ face shield etc. 6. Visual checks shall be done in order to ensure that no ‘rotten’ cargo is being loaded. So visually verify (more)
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    Category: Cargo Work
    Category: Cargo Work
    marinetales April 15, 2021
    Standardised Cargo : Standardised Cargo means a Cargo for Which a ship is provided with an approved securing system based upon Cargo units of specific types. Non -standardised Cargo : means Cargo which requires individual stowage and securing arrangements.
    Category: Cargo Work
    marinetales April 6, 2021
    Mixing fully refrigerated Butane with fully refrigerated Propane generates flash gas, and there is a risk that if the mixing is conducted too fast and/or the pressure tendency is not being monitored scrupulously enough, the ship’s cargo tank relief valves will lift – causing a hazardous, uncontrolled release of a LPG vapour cloud on the jetty and around the vessel. This is most likely to occur during the loading operation when the vessel’s tank pressures are typically higher than they normally are at any other stage of the voyage. During the loading operation all of the vessel’s compressors will normally (more)
    Category: Cargo Work
    marinetales August 23, 2020
    The timber loadlines are always above the normal loadlines. This means that the cargo of timber (or lumber) can be loaded more as compared to what would have been loaded if the vessel was using normal loadlines. Understand that the higher loadline means that the freeboard (in case of using timber LL) is lesser compared to when the normal loadline is used. The reason for this is when the timber is loaded on such ship it becomes a part of the ship adding/improving the reserve buoyancy of the vessel as a whole.
    Category: Cargo Work
    marinetales August 23, 2020
    A ship’s size is usually defined by the amount of cargo / deadweight / volume etc it caters to. Example a handysize vessel is so called because it caters to a certain size and is different from panamax and capesize. So how do we define the size of a container ship? As u know container ship carries ”boxes” unlike bulk carrier which carries cargo in bulk (the unit of which is in tonnes). So how do you define lowest unit on containers? It is the TEU or Twenty footer container. As you know that TEU is the smallest unit – (more)
    Category: Cargo Work
    marinetales August 23, 2020
    The Chain register is issued by the Classification society.