Question and Answers

    Question
    marinetales July 26, 2021
    My subsequent actions on taking the ground will largely be dependent on what I was able to do on running in to the shore line. Assuming that the prevailing conditions did not lend to any positive actions, I would: (a) Order the Chief Officer to walk back both anchors to prevent accidentally re-floating off the ground into a deep water predicament. (b) Order the Chief Officer to obtain a damage assessment, to include a full sounding of all the ship’s tanks. (c) Order the Navigator to obtain the tidal data for the next few days, paying particular attention to the heights and times of high and low waters. (d) Open up communications with owners/agents with the view to instigating repairs. Cause an entry to be made in the Official and Deck Log Books. (e) Order the crew to establish an oil boom (barrier equipment required) around the perimeter of the vessel. (f) In the event barrier equipment is not available, make an improvised boom with mooring ropes. (g) Ascertain the depth of water around the propeller. (h) Add additional ballast to the ship to reduce the possibility of uncontrolled movement of the vessel. (i) If and when appropriate, have tugs ordered to stand-by, especially so for when any attempt to re-float is to be made. (j) Inform the Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) as soon as practical by use of an Incident Report Form. (k) Display the appropriate ‘aground signals’ while on the beach. (l) Inspect the lower hull and the associated ground area at low water time by boat if necessary, in order to complete the damage inspection.
    marinetales July 26, 2021
    Beaching the vessel is an extreme action and would not be carried out if an alternative action to save the vessel was available. It is an action which is employed to save the hull, with the view to instigating repairs and to re-float at a later time with improved conditions. The ideal conditions for a beaching operation should include all or as many of the following conditions: (a) A daylight operation. (b) A gentle slope to the beach at the point of taking the ground. (c) A rock-free ground area. (d) Sheltered from prevailing weather. (e) Current-free and/or non-tidal situation. (f) Surf free. (g) Communications into and out of the beach area.
    marinetales July 26, 2021
    Track space for a search operation would be based on: (a) The target definition (size, afloat Yes/No). (b) Day or night search time. (c) State of visibility, rain, fog, mist or snow. (d) The likely quality of radar target presented, if any. (e) The height of eye and prominence of lookouts. (f) The number of surface search units employed. (g) The searching vessels speed of operation. (h) Recommendations from Rescue Co-ordination Centre (RCC) and/or On Scene Co-ordinator (OSC). (i) Recommendations from the International Aeronautical and Marine Search and Rescue (IAMSAR) Manual. (j) Area and intended search time before nightfall. (k) Availability of search lights for night operations. (l) Master’s experience.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    Following treatment shall be provided to a hypothermic person - a). Remove any wet clothing from the person and replace by dry clothing if available. b). Place the person in a Thermal Protective Aid (TPA) if available. c). Huddle other people around the chilled person to generate body warmth. d). Ensure that the entrances to the survival craft are battened down in order to raise the internal temperature of the raft.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    The casualty would experience discolouration of the skin, to a whiter pale shade. The lips could also turn bluish. When questioned the person may be incoherent. In acute hypothermia, loss of memory could be expected, pupil dilation and loss of consciousness could all follow.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    • Rocket parachute flare throwing red star. • Volume of orange-coloured smoke (smoke float). • Red hand flares (six per survival craft). Raising and lowering of the arms. • Burning bucket of oily rags. • Whistle – continuous sounding (any fog signal apparatus). • Square flag having above or below it a ball (improvised shapes). • Explosive signal (improvised axe bang on metal bucket). • Activation of Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) if carried in survival craft. • SART operation. • SOS transmitted by any means, use of flashing torch. • Spoken word ‘MAYDAY’ by means of walkie-talkie radios (carried under Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Regulations).
    marinetales July 8, 2021
    The Master’s legal requirements in the event of collision are to: (a) stand-by to render all assistance to the other vessel, (b) exchange relevant information with the Master or Officer in charge of the other vessel, (c) report the collision incident to the MAIB, (d) cause an entry regarding the incident to be entered into the Official Log Book (OLB).
    marinetales July 8, 2021
    A distress signal must be acknowledged and entered into the log book. The Master is expected to respond to the distress and offer assistance if it is considered reasonable to do so.
    marinetales July 2, 2021
    Following immediate actions shall be taken in above circumstances: (a) Cut the liferafts painter to release the raft. (b) Stream the sea anchor (drogue) and manoeuvre the raft away. (c) Batten down the access points. (d) Maintain and manage the liferaft.
    marinetales June 30, 2021
    In the event that the ship receiving the distress signal is unable, or in the special circumstances of the case, considers it unreasonable, or unnecessary to proceed to the assistance of the person(s) in distress, then the Master must enter into the Log Book the reason for failing to proceed to the distress scene.
    marinetales June 17, 2021
    The OSC should obtain a search action plan from the SMC via the RCC or RSC as soon as possible. Normally, search planning is performed using trained personnel, advanced search planning techniques, and information about the incident or distressed craft not normally available to the OSC. However, the OSC may still need to plan a search under some circumstances. Search operations should commence as soon as facilities are available at the scene. If a search plan has not been provided by the SMC, the OSC should do the planning until an SMC assumes the search planning function. On assuming the duty, the OSC should inform the appropriate CRS or ATS unit and keep it informed of developments at regular intervals. The OSC should keep the SMC informed at regular intervals and whenever the situation has changed. OSC should be conducting the search and may modify it.
    marinetales June 1, 2021
    1. Render assistance to other ships and crew, without endangering himself. 2. To stay by the ship until ascertained that no further assistance is needed. 3. To tell the other ship, name of the ship, port of registry, last port and next port. 4. Entry in Official Log Book and Signed. 5. Report to the Central Govt (within 24 hours), details of the accident, stating name of the ship, Port of registry, official number and its present location. 6. If pollution occurs, inform flag state and near coastal state. 7. Minimizing flooding and damage. 8. Inform underwriters/owners/flag state. 9. Prepare for minimizing pollution. 10. Collect evidence. 11. Prepare for salvage, if required.
    marinetales May 30, 2021
    1. Release lifebuoy with light and smoke signal on the side the crew member has fallen overboard 2. Take immediate avoiding action so as not to run over the man overboard 3. Sound three prolonged blast of the ships whistle and repeat if necessary 4. Post a lookout with binoculars and instruction to maintain a continuous watch on the man overboard 5. Hoist signal flag ‚O‘ 6. Commence a recovery maneuver, such as a Williamson turn or a single turn (Refer to wheel house poster) 7. Engage hand steering, if helmsman available 8. Note ship’s position. Wind speed and direction and time 9. Inform Master, if not already on the bridge 10. Inform engine room 11. Place engines on stand-by 12. Muster rescue boat’s crew 13. Prepare rescue boat for possible launching 14. Distribute portable VHF radios for communication 15. Rig pilot ladder/nets to assist in the recovery 16. Make ship’s position available to radio room/GMDSS station 17.Broadcast URGENCY message to ships in the vicinity
    marinetales May 30, 2021
    1. Sound General Emergency Alarm 2. Stop the vessel / Switch on lighting 3. All crew (or passengers) to be mustered (evacuated if required). 4. Display proper lights/shapes (NUC Signal) 5. Ensure all people are accounted for and no one is injured 6. Meanwhile, the Chief Officer shall conduct the Initial damage assessment and check for the extent for the four elements - - Watertight integrity of the Hull - Weather the Engine Room is flooded or not - Report on Casualty - render first aid if required - Report on any pollution - Observe for ship’s surroundings Assessment of the extent of damage shall be done - 1. By visual inspection of the area of the impact. Calculate the rate of the flooding by acquiring soundings 2. Visually estimate the size of the area damaged 3. Check damage stability by means of loadicator 4. Consider other factors such as Risk of fire/toxic fumes etc 7. The results and findings for the above shall be presented to Master and accordingly the communication to concerned parties shall be done 8. Be ready to Abandon if the situation deteriorates (which shall include preparing Lifesaving appliances and Survival Craft) 9. Contact other vessel and confirm the safety of the crew there 10. Check if the other vessel requires any assistance, if yes render the same without endangering the safety of the own vessel/crew 11. Follow the flag state procedures for identification of the vessel/exchange of required documents and letters and notification to flag state within the stipulated time frame Such information will at least include - Name of the involved ship, port of registry and last and next destination 12. Maintain records (log entry) 13. Damage control party shall be standby 14. Close all W/T doors and Fire door and start Bilge pump on affected areas 15. Depending upon how the circumstances unfold the decision for abandoning the vessel shall be taken. If the vessel is flooding continuously and Damage Stability 16. Assessment shows that the vessel shall not remain afloat, the procedures to abandon the ship shall be adopted 17. Assuming that the vessel is not flooding further - and the vessel is capable of maneuvering, the vessel shall navigate at slow speed under proper light/shape signals. 18.If the vessel is not capable of maneuvering, appropriate and timely assistance shall be requested 19. Any Pollution occurred shall be reported to the appropriate authorities in accordance with the vessel’s SOPEP Manual 20. The VDR should be backed up immediately
    marinetales May 27, 2021
    Following steps shall be taken when the breakdown with cargo gear (lifting appliances / cranes etc) is enountered - 1. Stop cargo operation 2. Prevent the movement of cargo, if possible, by taking extra lashings 3. Try ascertaining the fault - whether electrical or mechanical 4. If electrical fault, try reseting the power 5. If not troubleshooting to be carried out by the electrical officer in accordance with the manufacturers instructions 6. Meanwhile, if the weight is hanging in air, it can be lowered by manually overriding the crane brake 7. In case of hydraulic crane, oil levels and pressure shall be checked 8. Limit switches to be checked 9. Inform the terminal, charterers, owners, make an entry into log book. Amend the loading sequence.
    marinetales May 27, 2021
    The MFAG guide is a supplement to the IMDG Code. MFAG Table gives the likely symptoms, signs, treatment and other advice as per the exposure to the DG Goods given in the table. It also suggests the treatment in case of the skin contact, eye contact, inhalation and ingestion. The procedure for the treatment is also mentioned.
    marinetales May 22, 2021
    Extensively employed in salvage operations to hold a vessel’s position on station. Ships anchors with lengthy cable can be used for this purpose but generally, additional anchors and cables are brought in, specifically for this task.
    marinetales September 9, 2020
    In event of an oil spill , List of National Contact points and Authorities as stated in your SOPEP manual shall always be contacted. In case the pollution happens in the US waters... the QI ( Qualified Individual ) must be contacted.
    marinetales September 9, 2020
    The biggest threats here are pollution and fire. 1. Report / Raise the alarm 2.Activate the Emergency shut down devices/ trips 3. Inform loading/receiving trial of the same and ask them to stop pumping in case you are loading cargo 4. Raise the oil containment procedures 5. Follow emergency procedures as per the SOPEP 6. Fire fighting equipment shall be rigged and fire fighting team should be standby 7. Wilden pumps shall be used in order to transfer the oil to the slop tanks 8. In case oil goes over board national Contact points as per the SOPEP shall be contacted 9. Make an incident report and inform DPA 10. Log down events