Question and Answers

    Question
    marinetales July 30, 2021
    Segregated ballast means the ballast water introduced into a tank which is completely separated from the cargo oil and oil fuel system and which is permanently allocated to the carriage of ballast or cargoes other than oil or noxious liquid substances as variously defined in the annexes of the present convention
    marinetales July 30, 2021
    Enroute means that the ship is underway at sea, on a course or courses including deviation from the shortest direct route which as far as practicable for the navigation purpose will cause any discharge to be spread over as great an area of the sea as is reasonable and practicable.
    marinetales July 30, 2021
    Clean ballast means the tank in which, since oil was last carried therein has been so cleaned that effluent there from if it were discharged from the ship which is stationary, into clean calm water on a clear day would not produce visible traces of oil on the surface of the water or on adjoining shore lines or cause a sludge or emulsion to be deposited beneath the surface of water or upon adjoining shorelines. If the ballast is discharged through an oil discharge monitoring system, approved by the administration, the oil content of the effluent did not exceed 15 ppm
    marinetales July 29, 2021
    ANNEX 1: 1983 ANNEX 2: 1987 ANNEX 3: 1992 ANNEX 4: 2003 ANNEX 5: 1988 ANNEX 6: 2005
    marinetales July 29, 2021
    Protocols are important treaty instruments and are used when major amendments are required to be made to a convention which already adopted, has not yet entered into force.
    marinetales July 28, 2021
    A Cargo ship must carry - 1. International Tonnage certificate 2. International Load line certificate 3. International Loadline Exemption certificate 4. Intact stability booklet 5. Damage Control Booklet 6. Minimum Safe Manning certificate 7. International Oil Pollution Prevention certificate 8. Oil Record Book 9. Shipboard oil pollution prevention plan 10. Garbage managment plan 11.Garbage record book 12. Cargo Securing Manual 13. Document of compliance 14. Safety Managment certificate 15. Cargo Ship Safety Construction certificate 16. Cargo Ship Safety Equipment certificate 17. Cargo Ship Safety Certificate 18. Exemption certificate 19. Document of compliance (for DG Goods) 20. Document of Authorization (for Grain) 21. COFR 22. ESP 23. Ballast water management plan 24. Ballast water record book 24. Cargo securing manual
    marinetales July 28, 2021
    Certificates which are required onboard all ships - 1. International Tonnage certificate 2. International Loadline certificate 3. International Load line exemption certificate 4. Intact Stability Booklet 5. Damage Control Booklet 6. Minimum safe manning certificate 7. Certificate for Master, Officers and ratings 8. International Oil pollution prevention certificate 9. Oil record Book 10. International Air pollution prevention certificate 11. International Sewage pollution prevention certificate 12. Shipboard Oil pollution prevention plan 13. Garbage Management plan 14. International Ballast water management certificate 15. International Ballast water management plan 16. Cargo securing manual 17. Document of compliance
    marinetales July 28, 2021
    A treaty is a written international agreement between two states or between a number of states which is binding by the international law.
    marinetales July 28, 2021
    The standard documentation would require follow - 1. Crew List 2. General Declaration 3. Crew effects declaration 4. Ship's Store declaration 5. Maritime declaration of health 6. Passenger declaration 7. Bond store declaration 8. Cargo documents
    marinetales July 8, 2021
    Response to a distress is not required, if: (a) it is considered unreasonable or unnecessary to do so; (b) the distress vessel has sufficient vessels requisitioned to assist and your vessel is released from the obligation of attending; (c) action would endanger the Master’s own vessel and/or crew; (d) where the distress is cancelled and the distress party no longer requires the attending vessel(s).
    marinetales July 8, 2021
    A ‘Note of Protest’ is made: (a) When the ship has encountered heavy weather which may result in cargo damage. (b) Whenever damage has been caused or is suspected from any cause. (c) Where cargo has been damaged through a peril of the sea (i.e. inadequate ventilation because of the stresses of bad weather). (d) When cargo is shipped in such a state as to be likely to deteriorate during the voyage (B/Ls would also need to be endorsed in this example). (e) When the terms of the Charter Party (C/P) has been breached by either the Charterer, or his agent. Examples: refusal to load, or loading improper cargo. (f) When consignees fail to discharge cargo or to take delivery and pay freight. (g) In all cases of General Average, or failure to make a cancellation date due to heavy weather. It should be borne in mind that the act of Noting Protest should be made as soon as possible after arrival in port. Where a cargo Protest is being made, this should be carried out before ‘breaking bulk’. Where cargo is for several ports, a Note of Protest should be made in each port.
    marinetales July 8, 2021
    General Average is a sum of money that all parties to the venture have to pay to any one member who suffers a partial loss during the voyage. If a cargo owner does not pay his contribution, then the ship owner will have a ‘lien’ on the cargo.
    marinetales July 5, 2021
    The Certificate of Registry is issued by a Government to establish nationality and ownership of a vessel.
    marinetales July 2, 2021
    Overriding operational conditions means essential shipboard work that cannot be delayed for safety or environmental reasons or which could not reasonably have been anticipated at the commencement of the voyage.
    marinetales June 30, 2021
    In accordance with Regulation 26, of Annex 1, MARPOL, the SOPEP will be written in the working language of the ship’s Master and must contain: (a) The procedure to be followed by the Master or other persons having charge of the ship to report an oil pollution incident as required under Article 8, and protocol 1 of the present convention. (b) A list of the Authorities and Designated Persons ashore to be contacted in the event of a pollution incident (emergency numbers). (c) A detailed description of the actions to be taken immediately by persons on board to reduce or control the discharge of oil following the incident. (d) The procedures and point of contact on the ship, for co-ordinating shipboard action with national and local authorities in combating the pollution.
    marinetales June 28, 2021
    Regulation 37 of MARPOL Annex I requires that oil tankers of 150 gross tonnage and above and all ships of 400 gross tonnage and above carry an approved Shipboard Oil Pollution Emergency Plan (SOPEP). Article 3 of the International Convention on Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Co-operation, 1990, also requires such a plan for certain ships. Regulation 17 of MARPOL Annex II makes similar stipulations that all ships of 150 gross tonnage and above carrying noxious liquid substances in bulk carry an approved shipboard marine pollution emergency plan for noxious liquid substances. The latter may be combined with a SOPEP, since most of their contents are the same and one combined plan on board is more practical than two separate ones in case of an emergency. Few additional equipment must be included such as PPE kits, Chemical suits. To make it clear that the plan is a combined one, it should be referred to as a Shipboard Marine Pollution Emergency Plan (SMPEP).
    marinetales June 17, 2021
    MARPOL Regulation 36 - Oil Record Book, Part II - Cargo/ballast operations Every oil tanker of 150 gross tonnage and above shall be provided with an Oil Record Book Part II (Cargo/Ballast Operations). The Oil Record Book Part II, whether as a part of the ship's official log-book or otherwise, shall be in the form specified in appendix III to this Annex. The Oil Record Book Part II shall be completed on each occasion, on a tank-to-tank basis if appropriate, whenever any of the following cargo/ ballast operations take place in the ship: .1 loading of oil cargo; .2 internal transfer of oil cargo during voyage; .3 unloading of oil cargo; .4 ballasting of cargo tanks .5 cleaning of cargo tanks .7 discharge of water from slop tanks; .10 disposal of residues. Each completed operation shall be signed by the officer or officers in charge of the operations concerned and each completed page shall be signed by the master of ship.
    marinetales June 17, 2021
    MARPOL Regulation 17 - Oil Record Book, Part I (Machinery space operations) Every oil tanker of 150 gross tonnage and above and every ship of 400 gross tonnage and above other than an oil tanker shall be provided with an Oil Record Book Part I (Machinery space operations). The Oil Record Book, whether as a part of the ship’s official log-book or otherwise, shall be in the form specified in appendix III to this Annex. The Oil Record Book Part I shall be completed on each occasion, on a tank-to-tank basis if appropriate, whenever any of the following machinery space operations takes place in the ship: .1 ballasting or cleaning of oil fuel tanks; .2 discharge of dirty ballast or cleaning water from oil fuel tanks; .3 collection and disposal of oil residues (sludge and other oil residues); .4 discharge overboard or disposal otherwise of bilge water which has accumulated in machinery spaces .5 bunkering of fuel or bulk lubricating oil. Place, date and time of discharge operation is recorded. Each completed operation shall be signed by the officer or officers in charge of the operations concerned and each completed page shall be signed by the master of ship. Any failure of the oil filtering equipment shall be recorded in the Oil Record Book Part It shall be preserved for a period of three years after the last entry has been made
    marinetales June 17, 2021
    Regulation 11 - Discharge of sewage • Subject to the provisions of regulation 3 of this Annex, the discharge of sewage into the sea is prohibited, except when: .1 the ship is discharging comminuted and disinfected sewage using a system approved by the Administration in accordance with this Annex at a distance of more than 3 nautical miles from the nearest land, sewage which is not comminuted or disinfected at a distance of more than 12 nautical miles from the nearest land, the sewage that has been stored in holding tanks shall not be discharged instantaneously but at a moderate rate when the ship is en route and proceeding at not less than 4 knots; .2 the ship has in operation an approved sewage treatment plant which has been certified by the Administration to meet the operational requirements referred to in regulation 9.1.1 of this Annex, and .2.1 the test results of the plant are laid down in the ship's International Sewage Pollution Prevention Certificate; and .2.2 additionally, the effluent shall not produce visible floating solids nor cause discoloration of the surrounding water. • When the sewage is mixed with wastes or waste water covered by other Annexes of MARPOL 73/78, the requirements of those Annexes shall be complied with in addition to the requirements of this Annex.
    marinetales June 14, 2021
    The Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) was made mandatory for new ships and the Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) for all ships at MEPC 62 (July 2011) with the adoption of amendments to MARPOL Annex VI (resolution MEPC.203(62)), by Parties to MARPOL Annex VI. This was the first legally binding climate change treaty to be adopted since the Kyoto Protocol. The new MARPOL Annex VI Chapter 4: Energy Efficiency requirements Enter into force on 1 January 2013. Energy Efficiency Operational Indicator (EEOI) - • An efficiency indicator for all ships (new and existing) obtained from fuel consumption, voyage (miles) and cargo data (tonnes) • In its most simple form the Energy Efficiency Operational Indicator is defined as the ratio of mass of CO2 (M) emitted per unit of transport work The EEOI enables operators to measure the fuel efficiency of a ship in operation and to gauge the effect of any changes in operation, e.g. improved voyage planning and more frequent propeller cleaning, or the introduction of technical measures such as waste heat recovery systems or a new propeller. Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI): • It is an index quantifying the amount of carbon dioxide that a ship emits in relation to the goods transported. • Indication of energy efficiency by CO2 emission (g) per cargo carry (ton mile) The actual EEDI of a vessel is called the “attained EEDI” and is calculated based on guidelines published by IMO. The result must be below the limit “required EEDI” prescribed in MARPOL. • For existing vessels, the EEDI is in most cases irrelevant. It will become relevant only if a ship undergoes a major conversion that is so extensive that the ship is regarded by the Administration as a newly constructed ship. • For new ships, a technical file must be created showing the attained EEDI and its calculation process. • The EEDI and the technical file will be subject to verification by the flag administration. Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP): The Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) is an operational measure that establishes a mechanism to improve the energy efficiency of a ship in a cost-effective manner. • The SEEMP also provides an approach for shipping companies to manage ship and fleet efficiency performance over time using • The SEEMP seeks to improve a ship’s energy efficiency through four steps; i. Planning, ii. Implementation, iii. Monitoring & measures, iv. Self-evaluation & improvement. • All ships must have a SEEMP on board before the issuance of the first IEEC. • All vessels of ≥ 400 GT, to be provided with a ship-specific SEEMP not later than the first intermediate or renewal survey (whichever is first) on or after 1 January 2013.
    marinetales June 14, 2021
    Classification societies are bodies who lay down standards for the construction and maintenance of ships. Classification societies act under the authority delegated to them by the flag administration. Classification societies publish rules and regulations which are principally concerned with the strength of the ship, the provision of adequate equipment, and the reliability of the machinery. Ships may be built in any country to a particular classification society’s rules, and they are not restricted to classification by the relevant society of the country where they are built. Classification is not compulsory but the shipowner with an un classed ship will be required to satisfy governmental regulating bodies that it has sufficient structural strength for assignment of a load line and issue of a safety construction certificate. The classification process for the vessels comprises: 1) Assessment of the design during and after construction 2) Surveys at the time of construction, entry in to class and modifications to ensure that the vessel meets the criteria required by the rules 3) Issuance of a ‘Certificate of Classification’ and entering of the vessel’s particulars in to the society’s Register of Ships 4) Periodical surveys as required by the rules to ensure continued maintenance of conditions of classifications. 5) Additional surveys as considered necessary in view of damages, reported poor condition of the vessel by port state control authorities, etc.
    marinetales June 14, 2021
    1. Annual survey All ships are required to be surveyed at intervals of approximately one year (+ / - 3 months) i.e Anniversary date. During this survey the survey has to examine loadline items, Life saving appliances, fire fighting arrangements, Safety equipments, Bridge and Radio equipments and records etc. Items inspected are ventilators, hull structure, bulkheads, water tight doors, firefighting appliances, windlass, rudder, steering gear, all safety items, emergency machinery. 2. Docking survey (2.5 yearly, twice in 5 years but not more than 3 years) During this survey the vessel is dry docked so as to facilitate inspection of underwater fittings and hull. Particular attention is to be paid to the underwater shell plating. Stern frame, rudder, propeller, hull fittings and all hull parts. This can be exempted for few ships and replaced with a In Water Survey. 3. Special survey (4 years, 12 months are allowed) These surveys become due at 5 years intervals. The list 5 years from the date of built or date of special survey. During special surveys, the holds, peaks, deep tanks, DB tank, bilges, tank tops are inspected. In the way any corroded parts, the thickness of the plating must be determining during this survey. 4. Renewal survey (5 years) This survey is carried out by allowing all compartments of the hull or parts of the machinery that require a periodic survey are opened for survey and testing. It is carried out 5 years interval. 5. Repair survey: Following repairs, a survey is again conducted in which a surveyor again assesses the status of the vessel to ascertain if she has been restored to a condition meeting requirement.Temporary repairs may be permitted by issuance of an appropriate recommendation or condition of class. Where repairs are carried out at a place where the surveyor services are not available, survey must be carried out at the earliest opportunity thereafter. 6. Damage survey: A damage survey is performed to access the extent of damage sustained, to compile a list of recommended repairs and estimated cost to return the vessel to its condition before the incident. A damage survey is required by insurance companies when a claim has been submitted. It is part of a claim investigation to establish the probable cause and extent of damage.
    marinetales June 14, 2021
    Certificate of class certifies that a vessel has been constructed and equipped in accordance with the rules of the classification society. Certificate of class is NOT A statutory certificate. Simply because having certification from class is not a law its only a regulation.
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