Question and Answers

    Question
    marinetales July 25, 2021
    No, passenger vessels are not allowed to carry Class I (explosives) dangerous goods.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    (a) Low water rate/pressure in the scrubber. (b) High water level rate inside the scrubber. (c) High gas temperature. (d) Failure of inert gas blower. (e) High oxygen. (f) Power supply failure on automatic control. (g) Low water level in the deck water seal. (h) Low gas pressure. (i) High gas pressure.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    Dunnage is wood plank boards laid under cargoes to provide ventilation and in some cases assist drainage of moisture from cargoes. Some cargoes require ‘double dunnage’. All dunnage must be clean and free of oil or grease contamination as this could spoil cargo quality. Dunnage can be used as a separation mode between cargo parcels but its prime function is to separate cargo from the steel decks and avoid cargo sweat.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    The fouled anchor is the description given to when the anchor itself is fouled by some object like a cast off fishing wire, or even by its own cable turned around the fluke. A fouled hawse occurs when the vessel has moored with two anchors and ship’s anchor cables have become entwined, usually caused by a change in the wind direction, causing the vessel to swing in opposition to the lay of cables.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    Short stay is a term used to express a short amount of visible cable at a steep angle from the hawse pipe to the water surface. Whereas long stay is a term which describes where the cable is in a more horizontal direction towards being parallel to the surface of the water. The cable is said to ‘grow’ from a shorter stay to a long stay aspect.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    By watching the cable after applying the brake once the required scope has been played out. If the cable rises up, to long stay and then bows, to form a ‘catenary’, then rises again. This cable movement is an indication that the vessel is riding to her anchor not dragging her anchor. If the cable stays taught all the time it may be assumed that the anchor is dragging under the tension.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    The ganger length is the term given to the few additional links found between the Anchor Crown ‘D’ Shackle and the first (1st) joining shackle. The ganger length may or may not have a swivel piece within it.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    Good Holding Ground : Mud and clay Bad Holding Ground : Ooze, marsh, soft sand, rock, pebble.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    Anchor Crown ‘D’ shackle, shank, arms, fluke, pea or bill, crown, tripping palms. The lower part of the anchor attached to the shank is termed the ‘head’ of the anchor.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    Pump rooms on tankers are protected spaces and covered by a fixed fire extinguishing system, which is operated from outside of the compartment. (Usually a CO2 operation. Note: Pump rooms are treated as enclosed spaces.) After July 2002, under SOLAS II-2 Regulations 4, 5.10.3/4, cargo pump rooms were required to be fitted with gas detection/bilge alarm systems.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    The emergency fire pump must be capable of delivering the required two jets of water to any part of the vessel and also be able to produce a pressure of 2.1 bar on a third additional hydrant.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    I would check the condition of all the web straps that they are not worn and that they are secure about the body. Inspect the air content gauge and ensure that the bottle is full. When turning on the air valve I would listen for the ‘whistle’ alarm signal. When placing the mask over the face an even tension must be applied to the mask straps in order to create an airtight/smoke seal. This would be subsequently checked by shutting the air valve so that the wearer would experience the mask ‘crushing’ onto the face, so creating a partial vacuum. This denotes that the wearer is not drawing air from around the sealed mask, and is therefore providing an effective smoke seal. I would then open up the valve to allow the wearer to breath on demand. Finally, communication with the wearer and the control position would be checked to ensure a safe entry.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    A fireman’s suit with boots and gloves; a Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA); harness and safety line; a protective helmet; safety lamp; and a fireman’s hand axe with insulated handle.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    Following treatment shall be provided to a hypothermic person - a). Remove any wet clothing from the person and replace by dry clothing if available. b). Place the person in a Thermal Protective Aid (TPA) if available. c). Huddle other people around the chilled person to generate body warmth. d). Ensure that the entrances to the survival craft are battened down in order to raise the internal temperature of the raft.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    The casualty would experience discolouration of the skin, to a whiter pale shade. The lips could also turn bluish. When questioned the person may be incoherent. In acute hypothermia, loss of memory could be expected, pupil dilation and loss of consciousness could all follow.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    Following steps shall be taken in order to beach the liferaft - a) Order all persons to secure their lifejackets, and cause the floor of the liferaft to be inflated. b) Carry out the operation in daylight onto a beach area which is rock free and without surf. c) Deploy the sea anchor and man the two paddles on approaching the shore line, attempting to fend off any rock obstructions.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    To bring the lifeboat alongside the ship during launching, when the parent vessel has an adverse list.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    Ship's pyrotechnics are valid for 3 years.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    You should aim the rocket downwind – because the wind acts on the stretched line, not on the small rocket. This causes the line to ‘bow outward’ and allows the rocket to turn in towards the target area.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    The air in the bottle of the TEMSC is to allow the boat to clear the immediate area in a battened down condition so as to be free from toxics or harmful gases. Provided the boat is correctly battened down and sealed the air will last for a period of 10 minutes and will tend to pressurise the inside of the craft. This is expected to provide enough time for the boat to head upwind into a clean atmosphere.
    marinetales July 24, 2021
    • Rocket parachute flare throwing red star. • Volume of orange-coloured smoke (smoke float). • Red hand flares (six per survival craft). Raising and lowering of the arms. • Burning bucket of oily rags. • Whistle – continuous sounding (any fog signal apparatus). • Square flag having above or below it a ball (improvised shapes). • Explosive signal (improvised axe bang on metal bucket). • Activation of Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) if carried in survival craft. • SART operation. • SOS transmitted by any means, use of flashing torch. • Spoken word ‘MAYDAY’ by means of walkie-talkie radios (carried under Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Regulations).
    marinetales July 23, 2021
    Following markings can be found on the liferaft container - (a) The manufacture’s name and/or logo. (b) The instructions for launching in diagram and text format. (c) The capacity (manning) that the raft is designed for. (d) Whether it is equipped with a survival pack and type of pack (A or B). (e) The length of painter fitted to the survival craft. (f) The date of last service. (g) The next date of service due. (h) The symbol ‘do not roll’ sign.
    marinetales July 23, 2021
    The Safety of Life at Sea (Convention) (SOLAS) Regulations require the liferaft painter to be 15 m in length. However, it should be noted that manufacturers supply liferafts with a standard painter length of 25 m.
    marinetales July 23, 2021
    Six hand flares, four rocket parachute flares and two orange smoke floats.
    marinetales July 23, 2021
    One for every person on board plus an additional 5% and enough child lifejackets equal to 10% of the total number of persons on board to ensure one lifejacket for every child on board.